Teaching your little one to brush is a habit that should be started very young. Toddlers are learning by copying you, so they’ve likely watched you brush. Parents can start them early with no toothpaste. When brushing is started later, it can become a chore that children hate. Start them early, and they’ll love brushing.

Toothpaste for toddlers is much different than toothpastes for adults. They can’t handle the strong mint. It can actually burn their little mouths. The best toothpaste for kids won’t have artificial sugars or added flavors. The natural choices are often the best choices.

We’ve picked 5 of our favorite toothpastes here. They are choices that other parents have loved for their own kids, too. Many of them are backed by dentists and even the American Dental Association. We’ve also included a guide and frequently asked questions from new parents about brushing.

Best Toothpaste for Kids Comparison Table

Top 5 Toothpastes for Kids Review

Tom’s of Maine Fluoride-Free Children’s Toothpaste

The company was started when two parents wanted a healthier product for their family. They started with unprocessed food they made themselves. When all they found was toothpaste with artificial ingredients, they created their own. This was in 1970. Today, they’re still creating natural toothpastes for children.

Tom's of Maine Fluoride-Free Children's Toothpaste

Small children need special toothpastes. They’re just learning to brush. Much of the toothpaste gets ingested and can really make their tummies upset. That’s why there are natural ingredients in this toothpaste. It’s also fluoride-free, so tons of fluoride won’t get into their bellies.

This natural toothpaste gently cleans teeth with ingredients like calcium and silica. The flavor of Silly Strawberry doesn’t have artificial preservatives or flavors. The strawberry flavor comes from strawberries. There’s no sugar added, no gum flavor, and no artificial sparkles.

When you purchase this toothpaste, your money goes to a good cause. Ten percent of the company’s profits are invested in charities for children. Employees are encouraged to donate their time, too. They’re paid to go out into the world and give to causes that ignite their passion.

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Great positives

This is a fantastic toothpaste for toddlers who are learning to brush. There’s a certain amount of toothpaste that will end up in their bellies. This won’t hurt them at all.

While fluoride is good for children, too much ingested in their bellies can cause upset. It can also cause fluorosis. It’s a line on their teeth that’s caused by too much fluoride. It’s best to avoid fluoride until you can control how much they get.

Artificial ingredients are usually added to make kids like the taste. It’s supposed to encourage them to brush more often. This one has natural ingredients and an appealing taste of real strawberries.

Mild concern

The cap is hard for children to open. A parent will have to be there to open the toothpaste. That can be a plus or minus depending on whether your child needs supervision for brushing.

Colgate Kids Cavity Protection Toothpaste

Colgate has been around for over 200 years. It was founded in 1806. It started as a soap and candle company. Now, it’s a popular toothpaste company. It’s a brand everyone knows. Many of their toothpastes are accepted by the American Dental Association. This is one of them.

Colgate Kids Cavity Protection Toothpaste

The toothpaste has fluoride, which has been proven to fight cavities. It also fights tooth decay before you even know it’s a problem. This toothpaste has fluoride as well as hydrated silica to clean teeth. It’s sugar free. Some toothpastes for children are full of sugars, but that’s not a problem for this one.

It tastes good without being full of sugar. This has the flavor of bubble fruit. Kids will really love the flavor without the added problems sugar can cause. This is a good toothpaste for children when you’re trying to get them to brush regularly. The flavor isn’t harsh at all.

This is a good toothpaste for children old enough to brush without a lot of supervision. They need a tiny amount of toothpaste to see the best results. It’s great for enamel when used regularly. It’s free of harsh ingredients. There is no gluten in this toothpaste, either.

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Great positives

Children tend to gravitate towards things that taste good. They don’t understand toothpaste is brushing away germs, food, or plaque. As parents, it’s our job to think about those things.

This toothpaste has a light flavor that isn’t full of sugars to attract kids to it. The mild bubble fruit flavor is pretty appealing still. Kids will use it because they like the flavor even if they don’t understand cavities.

Badgering children to brush their teeth when they don’t like the flavor can be a real hassle. There isn’t a lot of foam with this, so they are able to brush for themselves as young as 3 years old.

Mild concern

Fluoride can upset a child’s stomach if they ingest too much. It shouldn’t be used by children who tend to swallow toothpaste.

Kid’s Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste

In the 40s, the Proctor & Gamble company wanted to reduce tooth decay for customers. They researched to find ingredients that would work. Crest was born from that research. They have received the American Dental Associations Seal of Acceptance for many of their toothpastes including this one.

Kid's Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste

Toothpastes are awarded the Seal when they are effective at what they promise. This one prevents and reduces tooth decay. As long as it’s used as the directions promote. They only give the seal to products without added sugar, too. This toothpaste is gentle on little teeth.

It fights cavities while being gentle. There’s Fluoristat in this toothpaste. It protects enamel from food and bacteria that might get left behind. It has a sparkle fun flavor that really entertains kids and encourages them to brush. It’s a tasty flavor kids will want to use. It’s gluten free and free of triclosan.

Great positives

Getting children started with good oral habits takes some time. A yummy toothpaste is one of the first things you should consider. It makes time in the bathroom fun.

While it’s fun for them, the toothpaste has to protect their teeth. The toothpaste has a job, and it’s not just being tasty for kids. This one has sparkles as well as fluoride. It’s an ingredient that protects the enamel.

Protected enamel can actively fight against the bacteria that leads to cavities. Crest is a proven brand that has been around forever. It has the ADA’s Seal of Approval, which means it does exactly what it claims.

Mild concern

Since it has fluoride, it shouldn’t be used by children under a certain age. It will depend on whether your child tends to swallow toothpaste or spit it out properly. Fluoride can cause issues in little ones who don’t know how to spit out toothpaste.

Jack N’ Jill Natural Organic Toothpaste

The couple who started this company wanted safe ingredients for their children. Since they had a background in pharmacy, they wanted to give other parents a natural alternative to all the additives others use. It’s a family business that’s been delivering products from Australia for many years.

Jack N' Jill Natural Organic Toothpaste

When you’re worried about the ingredients in your child’s toothpaste, going natural is important. In this toothpaste, the ingredients are completely organic. Your child will swallow toothpaste while learning to brush. That’s why it’s important to have ingredients that are not harmful.

The flavor is blueberry, which is a favorite of many toddlers. There’s no strong mint that could burn their little mouths. The flavor is natural and extremely gentle. Perfect for beginning brushing habits. It uses natural calendula to flavor the toothpaste.

Calendula has natural antibacterial properties and soothes organically. It has anti-inflammatory properties, too. That’s fantastic for toddlers who have sore gums. There are no SLS, parabens, sugar, or GMO ingredients in this toothpaste. It doesn’t have fluoride or artificial preservatives.

Great positives

From the inside to the outside, this toothpaste is safe for your little one. It doesn’t have nasty chemicals or artificial ingredients inside the toothpaste.

The packaging is also safe for toddlers. It’s free of BPAs, which can leak into the toothpaste in other brands. They use recycled and recyclable materials. Instead of plastics, the toothpaste is packaged using cornstarch and bamboo.

It’s essential that your little one learns to brush while being careful about the toothpaste. It’s inevitable that they will ingest some of the paste. It’s your job to make sure it’s healthy for them.

Mild concern

These are very small packages. If you want your whole family to use a safe toothpaste, you’ll have to buy one for each member.

Orajel Toddler Training Toothpaste Tooty Fruity Flavor

The Orajel brand is full of products for adults and children with tooth pain. It’s used for toothaches and mouth sores. Children are given Orajel when they have teeth coming in. They’re a trusted brand that also makes toothpaste for children.

Orajel Toddler Training Toothpaste Tooty Fruity Flavor

The best toothpaste for kids will be formulated for their age. This is a good one for toddlers. Some kids love to brush, but don’t have the skills to spit. They need toothpaste without fluoride. It has to be as organic and as safe as possible. That’s what you’re getting with this toothpaste.

It’s fluoride free as well as sugar free. Added sugar in your child’s diet should never come from toothpaste. This doesn’t have artificial colors, either. It has a patented ingredient called microdent. It is used to remove plaque buildup without harsh ingredients.

This toothpaste comes in fun flavors, too. There’s Tooty Fruity, which is great for kids up to 4 years old. Once they’ve become better brushers, they can move up to toothpastes with fluoride. It’s important to get them brushing early, but without causing intestinal issues.

Great positives

Toothpaste geared specifically towards toddlers should be packed with yummy flavors and no bad ingredients. That’s what you’re getting with this toothpaste from Orajel. It’s already a brand we all trust for our toothaches.

Little ones want to brush like they see you brushing. When you are in the bathroom together, you want to know the toothpaste you chose won’t make them sick. It’s never a good idea to swallow fluoride.

With this toothpaste, you know it’s completely safe. You can enjoy your time together without worry. You’re instilling habits that will serve them well throughout their entire lives. It’s one of the most important habits you can instill in them.

Mild concern

It’s a pretty small package of toothpaste at 1.50 ounces. You’ll need to pick up a couple if others enjoy the toothpaste, too. It’s still a good option for older children.

What to Consider Before Purchasing the Best Toothpaste for Kids

You want to pick a toothpaste for your little one that doesn’t have harmful ingredients. An adult toothpaste is too harsh for little mouths. Toddlers need a special toothpaste when they first start brushing.

  • Infant Gum Swiping

The first thing to consider is the age of the child. Parents can start using a wet washcloth on their infant’s gums. It removes anything from formula to cereal from the gums. After each feeding, the gums should be given a little swipe to remove food.

Once a tooth erupts, it’s time to think about brushing. Some parents will wait for a few teeth, but it’s important to start as soon as you see a little white spot. At this point, you’ll be starting with a tiny, soft brush and no toothpaste.

  • When Toddlers Begin Brushing

Once your toddler has a few teeth and can hold a brush, you can begin teaching. It all starts with them seeing you brush. They want to mimic everything you do. Make the experience fun, and your child will be right there to brush their teeth, too.

You can start with no toothpaste at all, but eventually, you’ll want to add toothpaste. It should be toothpaste without fluoride. Toddlers will swallow more toothpaste than they spit out. Too much fluoride can cause issues with their tummies. It can also create a problem called fluorosis, which impacts the enamel.

  • American Dental Association Seal

Once your child is old enough for regular toothpaste with fluoride, pick one with the ADA Seal. It’s the Seal of Acceptance given to toothpaste. It’s only given to those that are effective at stopping cavities.

Usually, the toothpaste with a Seal and fluoride should only be used with children who are able to brush and spit out the foam. This will depend on your child, but it’s usually around 4 to 6 that they develop the ability to spit.

  • What Ingredients are the Worst?

These are ingredients that you should avoid in your child’s toothpaste. They’re also not great for you, either. Fluoride in toddler’s toothpaste is not good, which we already covered. Artificial sweeteners and colors are usually chemicals.

Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a chemical detergent. It’s used to clean floors! It can cause canker sores and should be avoided. Carrageenan, propylene glycol, and triclosan should be avoided, too. They’ve been linked to serious health concerns.

  • Child-Friendly Flavors

To make brushing more appealing to children, pick a flavor that they’ll love. Most adult toothpastes have a minty flavor, but it’s very strong. Kids need a gentler flavor, and it should definitely be fun.

Many have sparkles, gum flavor, or fruit flavor. Keep in mind that some of the sparkles and flavors are not organic or natural. If that’s what you want, stay away from artificial flavors.

  • Moving to Adult Toothpastes

At some point, your child might want to move to the kind of toothpaste you use. Instead of using your toothpaste, you might want to use theirs. It’s safer for the body and won’t cause sores.

If you decide to start them on adult toothpaste, make sure it has fluoride for cavity fighting. You can find a natural toothpaste that won’t cause issues with their growing bodies, too.

Frequently Asked Questions

What age should kids start brushing?

It will depend on you as the parent. Usually when the first tooth erupts from the gums, you will need to start thinking about brushing. Some organic kids brands have organic brushes that are super gentle, too. You can begin around 12 months or after you talk to your dentist.

How much toothpaste should a kid use?

A toddler can use a small amount. Think of a rice grain. That single rice grain is the approximate amount you want to start your toddler at. An older child should have no more than a pea-sized amount.

Why do some children need to stay away from fluoride?

There’s nothing wrong with fluoride unless your child swallows too much. If your little one hasn’t mastered the art of spitting out toothpaste, you’ll want to avoid fluoride. Once she starts spitting, you can get a toothpaste with fluoride in it.

Won’t toddlers get cavities without fluoride?

Cavities are surprisingly common in young children. It’s important they are learning to brush and seeing a dentist regularly. The dentist can advise you about the risks of fluoride as well as how to avoid cavities. They often talk about flossing and preventative measures in little ones.

Conclusion

Teaching children to brush as a daily habit sets them up for a lifetime of healthy teeth. At first, you’ll start with a simple toothbrush. Eventually, toddlers will want toothpaste just like Mom and Dad. That’s when you have to consider a few things.

The toothpaste should be tasty without having added sugar. While fluoride is good for their teeth as they’re growing, new learners can’t use it in their toothpaste. It can be hard to find toothpaste without fluoride unless you’re going organic.

These are all things to consider for the best toothpaste for kids. We’ve given you a lot of knowledge here and hope that it helps making a decision much easier. The ones we’ve reviewed are good for kids – especially toddlers. All the research was done for you, so you can make a healthy, informed decision.

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